City homes

The Grocer’s House: frozen in time since 1932

image from: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/

image from: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/

Another time-capsule house! I just can’t get enough of these things.

Number 7 Blyth Grove in Worksop, England was home to grocer Mr. William Straw and his family.

When Mr. Straw died unexpectedly at the age of 68 in 1932, his widow and 2 sons resolved to leave the house exactly as it was on the day he passed.

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The Dakota Building

image from: en.wikipedia.org

image from: en.wikipedia.org

Spooky, ominous, regal and intimidating – The Dakota Building is one of New York City’s most iconic residential structures.

image from: www.stefenturner.com

image from: www.stefenturner.com

Located on the northwest corner of 72nd Street and Central Park West on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, this grand building occupies a prime spot overlooking Central Park.

image from: www.thetimes.co.uk

image from: www.thetimes.co.uk

It was built in 1884 when the Manhattan skyline was sparse and largely undeveloped…

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Funky historic row house for sale in Maryland

image from: www.redfin.com

image from: www.redfin.com

A reader sent me this listing for a very unique historic row house in Frederick, Maryland. This home dates back to 1885 and is for sale for $379,900. Have a look inside…

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The Netherlands Cube houses

image from: all-that-is-interesting.com

image from: all-that-is-interesting.com

Would you, could you, live in a box? A significantly tilted box – suspended above the street?

Well some hip urban folks in Rotterdam in the Netherlands have been embracing the concept for several decades now. This cluster of cube homes was designed by architect Piet Blom in 1984 to address high density housing issues while allowing for sufficient space on ground level for pedestrian activities.

image from: Wikimedia Commons (by:  Arroww)

image from: Wikimedia Commons (by: Arroww)

Each cube house is tilted at a 45 degree angle and perched upon a hexagon-shaped pylon. The entire cluster of cube homes is meant to represent a village within a city where “each house represents a tree, and all the houses together, a forest.” [source]

image from: Wikimedia Commons (by: Hanselpedia)

image from: Wikimedia Commons (by: Hanselpedia)

A forest………. interesting.

Known officially as Kubuswoningen, there are 40 cube houses that make up the development.

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Skinny, spiteful houses

image from: http://mentalfloss.com

image from: http://mentalfloss.com

They’re long, they’re lean and they are meant to be mean.

Mean to the neighbors who made someone mad enough to build a tiny house right beside them, cramping the views and ventilation and diminishing adjoining property values.

Yes, that is what all of the following houses have in common: they were built exclusively because someone got a bee in his bonnet.

The Hollensbury Spite House in Alexandria, Virginia

image from: http://www.nytimes.com

image from: http://www.nytimes.com

John Hollensbury built this narrow blue house wedged between two other homes in the year 1830. He owned one of the larger homes and the alley beside it, but did not like the fact that people parked their horses in the alley, or that vagrants hung out there. Known to be a cranky, antisocial kind of guy,  John Hollensbury took it upon himself to build a house in that space, darn it.

Below is a 1924 photo of the “Hollensbury spite house” in Alexandria Virginia

image from: http://tinyhouseblog.com/

image from: http://tinyhouseblog.com/

Turning heads at 7 feet wide and 25 feet deep.

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~ House Crazy Sarah ~

Sarah Felix Burns

"So many houses, so little time"

My first novel

JACKFISH - The Vanishing Village

My second novel

Song Over Quiet Lake