Sarah explores houses

My 5 favorite Christmas movie houses

image from:  hookedonhouses.net

image from: hookedonhouses.net

1) Funny Farm – Cap Cod house in Vermont

This is my absolute favorite movie. All the right elements come together for some big laughs, including the adorable Cap Cod style Vermont farmhouse where much of the drama takes place. Although the movie spans several months in the life of Andy & Elizabeth Farmer, the culmination of the movie is the Christmas scenes when the unlucky couple try to sell their house.

image from: highdefnews.blogspot.com

image from: highdefnews.blogspot.com

The day that the prospective buyers show up was supposed to be a snowy winter wonderland, but the area in real life had not seen any snow yet. The production crew was all ready to deck out the house and the surrounding property with fake snow, but lo and behold, the real stuff came pouring down the night before so the film crew had a nice fresh, authentic blanket of snow to work with.

image from: celebrityhomeforsale.blogspot.com

image from: celebrityhomeforsale.blogspot.com

Andy & Elizabeth Farmer impress the potential buyers with their quaintly decorated historic home that looks like it belongs on a Christmas card. Everything is perfect! Too perfect – and shenanigans ensue, as expected in any classic Chevy Chase movie.

image from: hookedonhouses.net

image from: hookedonhouses.net

The Funny Farm house is a real home in Grafton, Vermont and all of the interior scenes were actually shot on location inside the house. The owners rented it out for the duration of filming and the film crew put the owner’s furniture in storage and moved their own set decor in.

image from: hookedonhouses.net

image from: hookedonhouses.net

The home – which is locally called The Hall House – sits on a rise of land with great views of the Vermont countryside. A municipal fire water source pond is located right in the front yard – the “fish pond” in the movie. It was frozen over and made a great ice-skating rink in the snowy day scene.

image from: celebrityhomeforsale.blogspot.com

image from: celebrityhomeforsale.blogspot.com

Fans of the 1988 comedy still occasionally try to sneak up the private drive to catch a glimpse of the house. But beware, it is a private residence and as the movie portrays, there may be some weird characters up in them parts.

(Come on now, I’m kidding about the weird people part…. not so much about the no trespassing thing)

Check out this Hooked On Houses blog post for a very interesting and detailed look at the Funny Farm house in Vermont. For additional information about filming locations in Funny Farm, see this article from Vermonter.com.

 

2) The Christmas Card – Log cabin in Nevada City California

image from: www.chud.com

image from: www.chud.com

This lesser known movie is one of Hallmark’s sappy seasonal gems. Set in a real town in northern California called Nevada City, the movie tells the story of a Christmas card that was sent to the front lines of Afghanistan and then finds itself in the hands of a lonely soldier. The soldier was so moved by the card and the woman who wrote it that he set out to find her and her picture-perfect hometown while on leave from the war during the holiday season.

The Christmas Card Hallmark movie

The Christmas Card (2006) was shot on location in and around Nevada City and the locals helped to deck out the town in its Christmas best. Most of the downtown scenes show Victorian era homes and storefronts which all host an annual city-wide Victorian Christmas celebration.

image from: www.fbcnevadacity.org

image from: www.fbcnevadacity.org

But many of the crucial scenes in the love story take place in a nearby log cabin where Faith – the heroine and love interest – lives with her aging parents.

image from: www.themoviescene.co.uk

image from: www.themoviescene.co.uk

The large luxury log cabin is a stunner. I have read that it is indeed a real house and a family lives there so there aren’t any public images of the cabin other than screenshots from the movie.

The Christmas Card

If you ever get a chance to see this flick on the Hallmark Channel, the wonderful log cabin setting will make it worth your while.

I only wish I could’ve found more shots of the interior!

For more information on filming locations for The Christmas Card movie, see the Outside Inn website.

 

 

3) The Sound of Music – Trapp Family Austrian Villa

image from: www.tripadvisor.com

image from: www.tripadvisor.com

The Sound of Music is always on TV around the holiday season and though it doesn’t specifically deal with Christmas, it is an enduring family saga that evokes that warm fuzzy Christmastime feeling.

image from: juliainbogota.blogspot.com

The real Von Trapp family

The main house where the movie is mostly set is the Villa Trapp located in Aigen, outside of Salzburg, Austria. Just as this movie was based on a true story, so too was the magnificent house.

image from: image from: hotels-globally.com

image from: image from: hotels-globally.com

Although the actual former Von Trapp home was NOT used in the filming, it still exists and is now used as a bed and breakfast. Guests can tour the grounds and stay at the actual villa where the famous singing family once lived. I did an extensive post on the Trapp Family home in Austria a couple of years ago and it is still one of my most popular posts.

image from: www.flickr.com

image from: www.flickr.com

All of the interior shots of the Villa Trapp from the 1965 movie production were filmed on a soundstage. However, some of the exterior scenes from the film were shot at another real house just outside Salzburg which was located on a small lake. This house is called Leopoldskron Palace, a lavish estate that was once owned by famed theater director, Max Reinhardt and is now also a luxury hotel.

image from: redbubble.com

image from: redbubble.com

To discover additional real-life filming locations from the original Sound of Music film, check out this website.

image from: www.ronebergcairnscontinued.com

image from: www.ronebergcairnscontinued.com

 

4) Miracle on 34th Street – Susan’s dream house in the suburbs

image from: hookedonhouses.net

image from: hookedonhouses.net

Another proverbial Christmas favorite, Miracle on 34th Street (1947) is mostly set in downtown Manhattan at a pre-war highrise apartment building and of course, at the historic flagship Macy’s store.

image from: christmas-specials.wikia.com

image from: christmas-specials.wikia.com

The sets for the apartment scenes were very nicely representative of the era, but it is Susan’s “dream house” at the end  of the film that steals our hearts.

Young Susan first showed Santa a picture of the house that she wanted for Christmas:

image from: pinterest.com

image from: pinterest.com

Kris Kringle works his miracles, and Susan, her mother, and mom’s new love interest just happen to come upon the perfect little Cape Cod style house in the suburbs that coincidentally has a for sale sign in the yard.

Stop the car!

image from: internationalcinemareview.blogspot.com

image from: internationalcinemareview.blogspot.com

The cozy home is perfect for the new family and they fall instantly in love with it.

image from: www.cnbc.com

image from: www.cnbc.com

Although the interior shots of the house were filmed on a soundstage, the exterior shots were from a real life house that still stands today.

image from: the Nassau County Assessors website (2007)

image from: the Nassau County Assessors website (2007)

The home is located in Port Washington, New York. According the Zillow, it was built in 1943 and is just over 1,700 square feet. The exterior depicted in the movie is only slightly altered after all these years with new shutters and the addition of a second story dormer window.

Here’s a lovely photo of the famous movie house in the springtime:

image from: www.propertyshark.com

image from: www.propertyshark.com

You can read more about Miracle on 34th Street filming locations and sets at Hooked on Houses.

 

5) How The Grinch Stole Christmas – Who houses down in WhoVille

image from: www.ronebergcairnscontinued.com

image from: www.ronebergcairnscontinued.com

Okay, okay, so it’s not a real house, or town, but who doesn’t love the Who houses down in Whoville?

I watched the original cartoon version of How The Grinch Stole Christmas (1966) many times as a kid and I was always transfixed with the quirky Suessian homes in the make-believe town where everyone was nauseatingly kind and happy.

image from: hellogiggles.com

image from: hellogiggles.com

The naive locals were a bit much to handle, but I loved their colorful, disproportionate houses – so much fun to look at!

image from: pixgood.com

image from: pixgood.com

In the more recent 2000 remake of the cartoon classic, the set designers obviously had fun making the fantastical houses of Whoville…

image from: www.thestudiotour.com

image from: www.thestudiotour.com

According to Universal Studios Tours website, the Whoville houses were built next to the Psycho movie house on the large Universal Studios Hollywood back lot.

image from: www.flickr.com

image from: www.flickr.com

The rest of the scenes were filmed on indoor soundstages. The production of the 2000 version of How the Grinch Stole Christmas used 10 soundstages in total and was one of the largest users of space ever at Universal Studios.

image from: mynameisyeh.blogspot.com

image from: mynameisyeh.blogspot.com

Just looking at these happy Who houses makes me want to eat lots of cotton candy and sing Kumbaya!

 Happy Holidays from House Crazy Sarah!

Cindy Lou

The fallen soldier’s room frozen in time

image from: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ Photo by Matthieu Bock of Europe1.

image from: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ Photo by Matthieu Bock of Europe1.

I saw these intriguing photos doing the rounds on the internet and I had to look into them.

Here’s the back-story:

After a French World War 1 soldier was killed on the battlefield, his grief-stricken parents preserved his room exactly the way it was on the day he left for war. As a memorial to their fallen son, they kept the room in that state the entire time they owned the house. When they sold their house in 1935, they wrote a clause into the deed which stipulated the room must remain untouched for the next 500 years. Owners from that time on have honored their request.

soldier's room

image from: huffingtonpost.com / Photo by Matthieu Bock of Europe1.

The legality/viability of the clause is questionable, but wouldn’t it be amazing if it could be upheld for five centuries?

Continue reading

Vintage dollhouses: my personal finds

 

hand made antique doll house

Recently, I took a stroll through some antique stores in Florence, Colorado – affectionately known as the “antique capital of Colorado”. I came across so many vintage dollhouses that I thought I’d throw a post together with the pictures I took.

The first image (above) looked to be a folksy, hand-made affair – possibly even modeled after someone’s own house. Which I find so endearing!

The huge beauty (below) was more of a pro/factory job…

Continue reading

Christmas Houses

image from: pinterest.com

image from: pinterest.com

For us, our house was not unsentient matter—it had a heart, and a soul, and eyes to see us with; and approvals, and  solicitudes, and deep sympathies; it was of us, and we were in its confidence, and lived in its grace and in the peace of its  benediction. We never came home from an absence that its face did not light up and speak out its eloquent welcome—and we could not enter it unmoved.

—Mark Twain, 1896

image from: facebook.com

image from: front-porch-ideas-and-more.com

 

image from: http://www.1856countrystore.com/

image from: http://www.1856countrystore.com/

Continue reading

The house where the children fled

photo credit: Vivian Lee from memoryholeblog.com

photo credit: Vivian Lee from memoryholeblog.com

This week marks the one year anniversary of the tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown Connecticut. (December 14, 2012)

One of the stories of hope that came out of that terrible day was the story of the little yellow house down the street from the school.

This is where a group of first grade children fled after escaping the gunman and witnessing the death of their teacher (Victoria Soto) and many of their fellow classmates.

The small story-and-a-half historic home with green shutters is owned by a man named Gene Rosen.

Mr. Rosen is a 69-year old retired psychologist and grandfather.

image from: shelf3d.com

image from: shelf3d.com

Rosen told reporters that on the fateful morning, he had just finishing feeding his cats and was heading out to visit a local diner for breakfast. As he was going down his driveway, he noticed a small group of children huddled in a neat semi-circle at the end of his driveway. A school bus driver had seen them too and pulled over.

We can’t go back to school,” one of the children cried, “Our teacher is dead!

The kids recounted the unthinkable carnage they had just witnessed. This was the first time Mr. Rosen had learned of the school shooting – he told reporters he had indeed heard gun shots earlier but just assumed it was some hunters in the woods.

The school bus driver took down the names of the children and proceeded to radio their information to headquarters where the staff would try for the next several hours to track down the children’s stricken parents.

In the meantime, Mr. Rosen invited the children into his cozy home on that chilly December day.

Continue reading





~ House Crazy Sarah ~

Sarah Felix Burns

"So many houses, so little time"






Featured house artist:

Naomi Maddux - custom stained glass and mosaics

Featured house artist:

Julia Callon featured on Wondereur

(Click on the images above to learn more about these artists)

Featured house books:

Creating the Artful Home
Mushroom House of Charlevoix

(Click on the book cover images for purchase information)

My first novel

JACKFISH - The Vanishing Village

My second novel

Song Over Quiet Lake
Rivit Media Publisher