Colorado’s famous Spaceship House

image from: www.forbes.com

image from: www.forbes.com

Beam me up! When I think of Colorado (my adopted home state), I think of mountains, skiing, and the infamous Spaceship House. I have been in love with this beauty since I first laid eyes on her back in 2001.

image from: www.onlycolorado.com

image from: www.onlycolorado.com

While some claim the private residence to be downright ugly (Forbes magazine!) I think the house is absolutely captivating. And its mountain perch is the perfect setting for this UFO-esque thing.

image from: urban-review.com

image from: urban-review.com

Located just west of Denver in Genesee Colorado, The Sculptured House – its official name – is visible to passing motorists heading west on Interstate 70.

image from: www.forbes.com

image from: www.forbes.com

If you live in Colorado, you know this house. If you are a Woody Allen movie buff, you will also know this house from its appearance in the quirky 1973 sci-fi comedy Sleeper.

image from: www.thesun.co.uk

Sleeper movie still from: www.thesun.co.uk

Indeed, science fiction and comedy collide in this one-of-a-kind Colorado landmark built in 1963 by architect Charles Deaton. Locals have long referred to the structure as the “Flying Saucer House”.

Here’s a rare photo of the shell being constructed in the early ’60’s:

image from: www.vebidoo.com

image from: www.vebidoo.com

Interestingly, Charles Deaton also designed several sports stadiums in the US including Kansas City’s Arrowhead Stadium.

image from: www.imfromdenver.com

image from: www.imfromdenver.com

The architect described his inspiration for the home in this way:

On Genesee Mountain I found a high point of land where I could stand and feel the great reaches of the Earth. I wanted the shape of it to sing an unencumbered song.

– Chalres Deaton

image from: www.kontaktmag.com

image from: www.kontaktmag.com

While Deaton was the imagination behind the design, a company called Delzell Inc. was the ambitious builder of the home. Unfortunately, the company’s owners ran out of money before the project was complete. The interior of The Sculptured House was left unfinished for almost 3 decades until a Denver based developer bought the house in 1999. He had Charles Deaton design a large addition and hired Deaton’s daughter Charlee to finish the interior design. It was completed in 2003.

image from: www.moderndesign.org

image from: www.moderndesign.org

The home was sold again in 2006, but by 2010, the new owner had become delinquent on the mortgage and the property went into foreclosure. It sold at auction in November 2010 for $1.5 million

image from: www.denverpost.com

image from: www.denverpost.com

The entire home has five levels – 7,700 square feet – with 5 bedrooms and 5 baths.

image from: www.moderndesign.org

image from: www.moderndesign.org

image from: analiseindiscreta.wordpress.com

image from: analiseindiscreta.wordpress.com

image from: www.ncmodernist.org

image from: www.ncmodernist.org

On the top level is an awe-inspiring master suite.

image from: www.coloradohomesmag.com

image from: www.coloradohomesmag.com

The windows! The VIEWS!

image from: www.vebidoo.com

image from: www.vebidoo.com

It is probably the most iconic architectural landmark in Colorado, and certainly one of the most beautiful homes in a sea of atrociously expensive ski McMansions.

Personally, I’ve always thought it looked like a giant smiling clam…. the Cheshire Cat smile of architecture.

image from: been-seen.com

image from: been-seen.com

The big flip of the finger, wink and a nod.

 

Sources:

ImFromDenver.com

Wikipedia Sculptured House

Roadside America

DenverPost.com article

 

 

Check out another odd movie house in a spectacular setting that I profiled a while ago: Casa Malaparte

Casa Malaparte

 

 

10 Comments

  • angela says:

    there is also a space house on Lookout Mtn., Tn. (my home town) but it is nothing like the one in this blog.

  • Sue says:

    Great find and would be shocking to see if traveling down the highway. I don’t remember Sleeper, but that’s cool that it was used in a movie too.

  • Nury says:

    This house is amazing and i agree with you that it looks like a smiling clam..i enjoy reading all your post..i even read it during my work & lunch time..i just love reading all the story and history behind each house and amazed that you actually able to get all the information…good job and continue doing it with a smile =) ill definitely gonna read it..

  • Nick Kirby says:

    I love this one.It also reminds me of the “Iron Man” house.That would be a dream home of mine.Maybe when a jet flys over and a couple billion lands in my front yard with a note that says I’m Yours! I can afford one of ’em :)

  • Nascara says:

    I get so excited when I see it! Thanks for featuring it.

  • Roger A. Reed says:

    Sarah,

    Hi there! I am actually working on a lecture here in Kansas City that will feature the Truman Sports Complex [of which Arrowhead Stadium is one of the two stadiums Deaton designed here in KC].

    In conducting research on Deaton, I found your blog post and was wondering if you could share with us any back ground information you may have gathered. We know that Deaton still has some family in Denver and a daughter in or around Minneapolis. . .we would really like to get in touch with them to gain as much insight as possible to really tell his story.

    Any help you could provide would be greatly appreciated.

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