Built by William Seabrook in 1810, Seabrook Plantation is the epitome of Southern elegance…

image from: http://www.plantationservicesinc.com

I don’t think I’ve ever featured a southern plantation here on House Crazy, but when I happened upon Seabrook Plantation in South Carolina, I just had to share it with you.

image from: http://www.plantationservicesinc.com

Located in Edisto Island, Charleston County South Carolina, Seabrook Plantation is an amazing historic property.

image from: http://www.plantationservicesinc.com

But it is no dilapidated Grey Gardens. Rather, Seabrook has been meticulously maintained and is currently listed on the market for $9,500,000 smackers.

image from: http://www.plantationservicesinc.com

Seabrook is one of the most beautiful plantations on the East Coast. Located south of Charleston, South Carolina. The property covers 350 acres of a virtual Eden of semi-tropical landscapes and gardens with substantial water frontage and views for miles.

– from: http://www.plantationservicesinc.com

If I were a film location scout, I’d be drooling over this estate…

image from: http://www.plantationservicesinc.com

The mansion has been classically decorated and retains many of the original architectural features.

image from: http://www.plantationservicesinc.com

But it’s not all great grampa’s house inside… the kitchen has been updated in recent years:

image from: http://www.plantationservicesinc.com

[Not that great grampa wasn’t stylin’! Because I’m sure he was!]

All of the windows in this 4-story home look out onto the lushly treed property, not far from the Atlantic ocean.

image from: http://www.plantationservicesinc.com

The property also includes two guest houses, a caretaker’s house, two docks, a tea house, several storage sheds and green houses.

The plantation & grounds have been used as a hunting lodge and retreat since the 1930’s. The land is rich with live oaks and hanging Spanish moss…

image from: http://www.plantationservicesinc.com

[An interesting aside: I recently learned that “live oaks” are so named because they stay live year round – they do not go dormant or lose their deciduous leaves in winter. If you are from the south, you are laughing at me right now. If you are from any other area, you’re probably thinking: “Neat stuff!”]

Most of the out-buildings dotting the estate are newer than the 1810 main plantation house, for example, the carriage/guest house below (which could be a mansion in its own right!)

image from: http://www.plantationservicesinc.com

So who was the wealthy chap that built this estate?

Mr. Seabrook was one of the first planters who accumulated a fortune by growing Sea Island cotton. He was a pioneer in the use of salt marsh mud as fertilizer and he established a steamboat line that ran between Charleston and Savannah.

His initials are apparently preserved on the ironwork of the front staircase.

Below is the charming “tea house”…

image from: http://www.plantationservicesinc.com

According to Wikipedia, there is evidence which indicates that the architect of the White House – James Hoban – was also the designer of Seabrook Plantation.

image from: http://www.plantationservicesinc.com

The history of Seabrook is long and colorful.

At the end of the Civil War, the Sea Islands below Charleston were abandoned to the Union Army forces. The house was used for staff headquarters and provost. After the war ended, freed slaves temporarily took refuge in the house.

– from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Seabrook_House

image from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:William_Seabrook_House, (by: Charles N. Bayless)

I love a house with a tumultuous and intriguing history!

For all the details on Seabrook Plantation, see the complete listing here and the Wiki page here.