‘In Cold Blood’ murder house in Holcomb, Kansas

image from: www.pinterest.com

image from: www.pinterest.com

On a cold mid-November night in 1959, this unassuming farmhouse in rural Kansas was the location of the brutal murders of 4 members of the Clutter family.

The case – and the house – became infamous after flamboyant American writer Truman Capote took an interest in the homicides and decided to visit the small town where the crime took place in Holcomb, Kansas.

Truman Capote:

image from: www.pbs.org

image from: www.pbs.org

Capote was so taken with the murders that he embarked on a 6 year-long journey of chronicling the story and the capture, prosecution, & execution of the perpetrators  Richard “Dick” Hickock and Perry Edward Smith.

Capote’s odyssey resulted in his opus magnum: In Cold Blood, which later became a major motion picture in 1967.

The house at the center of it all sits at the end of Oak Avenue on 7 acres of pastoral farmland.

image from: en.wikipedia.org

image from: en.wikipedia.org

The original farmstead was called “River Valley Farm” and locals still refer to the property as such. The current 2-story farmhouse was built in 1948 for $40,000 by Herb Clutter in order to house his family of six.

If you haven’t read the book or seen the original movie about the Clutter murders (or the more recent 2005 Hollywood film Capote), let me fill you in on the crime.

Two criminally-minded drifters heard rumors that Herb Clutter was a wealthy farmer who kept $10,000 hidden inside his house outside rural Holcomb. On the night of November 14, 1959, they broke into the family home with the intent of robbing the family.

When they did not find the money, the pair became enraged and ended up shooting/slashing Herb Clutter, his wife Bonnie, and their 2 youngest children Nancy, 16, and Kenyon, 15. (Two older daughters were already grown and out of the house.)

The Clutter family victims:

image from: incoldbloodtrumancapote.blogspot.com

image from: incoldbloodtrumancapote.blogspot.com

1959 crime scene photo:

image from: www.dailymail.co.uk

image from: www.dailymail.co.uk

Six weeks after the heinous murders of the Clutter family, Dick Hickock and Perry Smith were arrested – thanks to a jailhouse snitch. After five years of trials and appeals, they were both hanged on April 14, 1965.

Once Truman Capote’s book was released the following January, the town of Holcomb – and particularly the Clutter farm – became the focal point of widespread fascination with the crime. The 1967 film adaptation In Cold Blood was actually filmed on location in Holcomb and inside the actual house on Oak Avenue where the murders took place.

*shivers*

image from: roadtrippers.com

image from: roadtrippers.com

The house was sold in 1964 to a divorced cattle rancher named Bob Byrd. Byrd, however, traveled frequently to tend to his ranches and was hardly ever at the Clutter house. He was the one who rented out the house to the film crew for the 1967 movie. Tragically, Bob Byrd committed suicide after 20 years of owning the property – though not inside the house.

In 1990, Leonard and Donna Mader purchased the house from two of Bob Byrd’s relatives who lived there for a time after his suicide. The Maders were long-time Holcomb residents already familiar with the Clutter house, having visited there numerous times.

image from: http://www.hauntedcolorado.com

image from: http://www.hauntedcolorado.com

In 2006 the house went up for sale – actually, it went up for auction. But it failed to get an adequate minimum bid and was subsequently taken off the market. Presumably it is still owned by the Mader family.

Here are some interior photos from when the house was listed in 2006:

image from: ww.hauntedcolorado.net

image from: ww.hauntedcolorado.net

Above is the kitchen with original cabinets designed by Herb Clutter himself.

image from: ww.hauntedcolorado.net

image from: ww.hauntedcolorado.net

Below: the ominous steps to the basement where Mr. Clutter was shot and killed:

image from: ww.hauntedcolorado.net

image from: ww.hauntedcolorado.net

1959 crime scene photo of the basement:

image from: www.gcpolice.org

image from: www.gcpolice.org

(Don’t worry – I didn’t use any dead body pictures in this post.)

The upstairs hallway:

image from: ww.hauntedcolorado.net

image from: ww.hauntedcolorado.net

The master bedroom where Mrs. Clutter was found dead:

image from: ww.hauntedcolorado.net

image from: ww.hauntedcolorado.net

That same bedroom in 1959 after her body had been removed:

image from: www.gcpolice.org

image from: www.gcpolice.org

Another upstairs bedroom:

image from: ww.hauntedcolorado.net

image from: ww.hauntedcolorado.net

Truman Capote posed here for a magazine article promoting his book in 1967:

image from: www.theguardian.com

image from: www.theguardian.com (photographer: Steve Schapiro/Corbis)

The current owners of the Clutter murder scene house have been pestered by morbid lookiloos since they first bought the house over 2 decades ago.

At one point in the early 1990’s they were so frustrated with all the unwanted visitors, that they decided to open the house up for tours and charge people a $5 fee so that they could have some monetary compensation for their troubles. The house tours, however, were short-lived because the Mader family grew weary of having to keep their home in show-ready “museum” condition. (Ugh, I know the feeling!) Plus, relatives of the deceased accused the Maders of trying to profit from the tragedy.

image from: www2.ljworld.com

image from: www2.ljworld.com

Rumors persist that the house is haunted by the ghost of Nancy Clutter – the pretty teenage daughter of Herb Clutter – whose apparition is said to walk the house at night. But this claim is probably more of an internet fabrication than a true tale since the current owners claim no paranormal activity takes place there.

Today, the entrance to the property on Oak Avenue is guarded by large “No Trespassing” and “Private Drive” signs.

image from: www2.ljworld.com

image from: www2.ljworld.com

But people still show up at the end of the lane to take pictures and gawk at the house where 4 members of the Clutter family were killed in cold blood.

Truman Capote’s non-fiction book In Cold Blood, went on the become one of the best-selling true crime novels of all time.

image from: www.abc.net.au

image from: www.abc.net.au

Sadly, Capote became so obsessed with the case that he descended into severe depression and alcoholism and never again published another full-length book. He died in 1984 from liver cancer.

No happy endings in this one folks. :(

 

~~~

***Please note that the former Clutter house on Oak Avenue is a privately owned residence. Please respect the right to privacy of the current occupants of the house.

 

Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_Cold_Blood

http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/clutter-family-home

http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2005/apr/06/in_the_end/

http://www.thedailybeast.com/galleries/2010/08/09/haunted-homes.html#38bd1069-1970-414f-a5d2-020ae531d771

https://roadtrippers.com/places/in-cold-blood-clutter-house-holcomb/22745

http://www.trutv.com/library/crime/notorious_murders/family/clutter/3.html

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2009/nov/16/truman-capote-in-cold-blood

http://www.hauntedcolorado.net/In_Cold_Blood_House.html

 

[A special thank you to Deanne for requesting this post!]

 

 

 

49 Comments

  • livewire1965 says:

    Sad story but the home is still beautiful

    • Jeff Balaam says:

      I was fortunate enough after getting in contact with one of the owners daughters to be invited out for the day to The Clutter House. It was a 3 year back and forth communication but finally got the thumbs up. I guess I would have been cautious to if I were them….but anyway after a 40 year interest in the case….this was an lifetime dream to be able to be inside that house. It was surreal when I first walked in and I actually was shaking for the first hour because I could not believe I was there. The owners are such kind people Herb Clutter would be proud they’ve taken such good care of the house. I thought perhaps I would have some anxiety as I toured and sat in each room…..and spent time in the basement…..but I didn’t….It’s just a beautiful house on beautiful land where something unthinkable happened over 50 years ago. I thought I knew everything about the house but learned many new things such as there’s a fourth room upstairs next to where Bonnie Clutter was murdered. There is a “Summer Kitchen” they call it where you can shut all the doors off to the main house and there’s another kitchen that leads out into the back of the home. Alot of other things too that I’m so happy to have learned. Next month it will be a year ago and I still can’t believe that April Sunday I spent there…..as it was turning nightfall…..I walked back and forth, down and back the long chinese elm drive that leads to house….the one Capote so beautifully describes in the beginning of the book….

      • housecrazy says:

        Jeff, thanks for sharing that. It is somehow comforting to know that the house is well taken care of, and I like the way you’ve mentioned that Herb Clutter would be proud.

        • Jeff Balaam says:

          Oh you are welcome….I could talk about it all day long. I was 10 years old when I saw the Richard Brooks Film and it just became a passion of mine all these years…absorbing everything I could. Mrs. Mader made the nicest compliment to me as I was leaving…she said they had never met a nicer person who had come to see the house and that I knew more than did…..I cherish her saying that. I can still see her sitting in the dining room of the house and I hugged her thanked her…(And I’ve done so a million times since as well as to her wonderful daughter who set the visit up) They presented me with a beautiful framed photo of the lane taken during a Christmas Snowfall and also gave me small bricks from the fireplace in the living room….if you’ve seen the early 50’s Clutter Christmas photo they are standing in front of it….Also I brought them an enlarged Canvas of the photo of Capote standing by the fireplace looking out towards the living room window. The daughters captured a photo of me in the same stance. I have both enlarged side by side on my “Clutter Wall”…..one more very interesting detail. I own the JESUS CHRIST painting that Perry Smith did in prison…it’s signed by Hickock….If you know about the Kansas Reads Program about 6 years ago, the owner let the library display it for a week. He then put it on Ebay….I got in contact with him and it was mine a week later. But anyway, I drove with that framed painting in the trunk of my car from California all the way to Kansas. About an hour after I was there…I asked Donna if it was okay if I brought something in…..They had strange looks on their faces but I think they liked me from minute one….anyway…I brought it in….No disrespect to the Clutters….If it was any other subject painting I would not have brought it in…..But I photographed it in every room in the house and basement. Although I feel the house is already blessed….it was blessed again…and the weird part…is that it was 54 years since Perry & Dick had been in that house…..and they were back again….but this time perhaps with regret and gulit and asking forgiveness….with everything I know about the Clutters I feel they have forgiven Perry & Dick as well as the two surviving daughters….I don’t know….I can only imagine the morning of November 15, 1959 when the phone rang and the Clutter Daughter heard what had happened…..but all these years later I guess you’d have to go thru such a horrific thing to really know what the true experience is like….and I wish them peace….What happened in that house affected so many people…just think about it…from the family to Capote to KBI & FBI to all the millions and millions and millions of people whi have seen the film and read the book. Herb Clutter could have never imagined in 1948 when the house was built, that 11 years later two strangers would drive down that beautiful lane and end everything he loved and created. And Nancy….would she ever believe that an actress would be playing her on the same screen where she and Bob Rupp had been to the theatre before in Garden City….or be in a book that is still read by so many still today….it’s really complex to think about it…but I have a thousand times and will continue for the rest of my life….

          • wildflower says:

            You claim to know so much; you would know both killers were sociopaths who had no remorse or empathy for their victims, that Smith did not believe in God, the Clutters did and bringing a picture created by the hands of the murderers defiled that house. Would Nancy Clutter not think that picture placed and photographed in her bedroom obscene?

          • Jeff Balaam says:

            I don’t claim to know “so much”…I do know so much!….I’ve studied the case for over 40 years and talked with numerous people involved. I believe Nancy Clutter would have forgiven both Dick & Perry and bringing the painting of “Jesus Christ” into her room, I felt was a “healing”….if it had been a painting of sailboat I would not have brought it with me and into the house. The info you added in your email is nothing more than what someone would learn from watching the movie once. I think if you spoke to the current owners of the home…they would not think of my visit as a “Defiled” one….You can think what you want to think…I’ll think what I know….

    • John Bales (AR) says:

      I’ve been interested in the story for many years. The black & white film of the house didn’t do it justice, it’s beautiful. Mr. Clutter designed a lot of interesting features for the house, such as the storage wall in the upstairs hallway that you see in the photos above. All the rooms are lovely but I particularly love the kitchen. Normally not a fan of older kitchens but this one I like. The tile work on the counter really makes it and Mr. Clutters cabinets are still beautiful. This is a home that needs a family that will make it a home filled with love and laughter and kids and grandkids, what the Clutters should have had. Of course, an electric privacy gate on the drive would be the one thing any new owner would want to install! Thanks for the great photos and an interesting story

      • housecrazy says:

        Thanks for your comment John!

      • Jeff Balaam says:

        The house has been filled with Children & Grandchildren for years as the family that owned it since the early nineties andnhas lived there longer than the Clutters did. The house is warm and beautiful and the warmth embraces you the moment you walk in the front door. I feel Richard Brooks film is flawless and with Contad Hall doing the lighting made the house it’s own character. I will never forget my time spent in the house….especially in Nancy’s Room. Everyone should read the current article in DEEP SOUTH MAGAZINE with Brenda Currin who played Nancy in the film and she talks about time in the Clutter House during the filming.

    • Robert says:

      From what you could tell The Clutters were much better decorators and positioned beds in a more suitable to room fashion.

  • Sue says:

    Thank you so much for the clarity about In Cold Blood. I never read the book, but saw my Mom reading it. I never saw the movie either. I am now so sad at the loss this family suffered as if it just happened. Love the bright happy kitchen and all the rooms are nice really. Did not know Capote was obsessed about the crime, but he must of drenched himself in the details to write the book.

  • Sel says:

    interesting post…..Capote, an enigma of himself brought forth many issues…
    not from the result of his book, rather, the self inflicted behavior throughout
    his silently suffered life. Facing ones demons is never an easy thing..

  • Deanne says:

    AWESOME!! Well written and great photos! Thanks for giving me props at the end, so happy it worked out! I will miss this blog! Wishing you the best!!!!

  • Perri R. says:

    Great post (I just watched “Capote” last night, so this was timely). “In Cold Blood” is a must-read – not entirely factual, but an astonishing novelization of a true tragedy. The house is so much more beautiful than I thought it would be, lovely design, and I didn’t know Mr. Clutter had built it himself. It’s a pity that people continue to come to gawk, but I can understand the public’s ongoing curiosity, too.

  • Suzan S. says:

    And now it’s additionally sad that Philip Seymour Hoffman, who won an Oscar for his portrayal of Capote, is dead from an apparent drug overdose. (02 Feb. 2014)
    He left behind a longtime partner, Mimi O’Donnell…and 3 kids aged 10 and under.
    RIP Philip

    On a happier note, I Loved the white tile kitchen countertop with the blue tile lip on the edges. Love the opening into an eating area that Mr. Clutter allowed for when designing the cabinets.

  • ciara greenwood says:

    So weird that i’ve been in a house like this several times. My mother grew up in holcomb and was alive when this happened. The house has been previously owned by some family friends of ours and they actually give private tourings to anyone that knows them. They have paid us to clean their windows more than once and in the house, they have the bedroom where the mother was killed, you walk in and you feel all the happiness sucked from you. they have all their christmas stuff in there, but the moment you walk in, you just feel so sad. Mrs. Mader went into the basement and broke a glass down there and it echoed through the house and you could hear it breaking as loud as if it were in the room with you. She said that it was the effects of what the mother must have felt like hearing her husband, son and daughter killed in all the rooms before finally it was her turn, all the while bed ridden and unable to get out to safe herself or them. A very sad sory.

  • Jennifer Harrison says:

    Such a tragedy!! But so nice to see that the house is still basically the same as it stood when Mr. Clutter had built it!! Love the kitchen.

  • I “happened” onto this website and now have chills. I was 9 years old when this horrible crime was committed. I will be 65 this year. In 2009, Holcomb spoke about the 50th anniversary of the crime. This year will be the 50th year since the execution of Hickcock and Smith. This case haunts me still today. I have read the book at least 12 times and watched both movies many, many times. I have tried to imagine the fear and mortal terror of this lovely family. Nancy and Kenyon could have been my older sister and brother. Because I lived in Pennsylvania in 1959 (and still do), I don’t know if the news of this tragedy ever reached the east coast. I plan to visit Garden City and Holcomb this summer on my way to Arizona where I will live out my retirement. Just being in that town and walking through the park that was dedicated to the Clutter Family will give me an idea of just how unnecessary and unlikely this could happen in a small town like Holcomb. This crime affected so many people for so long. I am not superstitious, nor do I believe in ghosts, but I don’t think I could go into the house, although I would like to do so. I will stop at the First Methodist Church and say a prayer and put some flowers on the graves. I hope everyone will continue to remember this wonderful family who were kind to everyone, yet were taken away much too soon.

    Thank you, Crazyhouse, for sharing this information. The house is still beautiful–a wonderful tribute to the memory of the family who loved it so. Once we pass April 15, 2015, I think the people of Holcomb who remember this crime can finally get some peace. They are the “salt of the earth”–just the kind of people we all should strive to be.

    • housecrazy says:

      Thank you for your comment Joanne – very touching.

    • Jeff Balaam says:

      The house inside is as beautiful as when The Clutters owned it. The present owners have lived there twice as long as the Clutters did. When I was in the home a few years back I felt nothing but peace……The complex feelings I had was separating the crime scene from the movie set…If you’d like to see photos from my visit I’d love to share them with you…jefferama@aol.com

  • shortney1985 says:

    That kitchen is so quaint! I am in love with this blog. I’ve always had a fascination with all things paranormal, supernatural, occult, gory, morbid, macabre, etc. ever since I was a small girl. I’m nearing 30 and I still have an insatiable thirst for knowledge about these sort of topics. I’m so glad I stumbled upon your blog. My husband and I watched the 2005 version of The Amityville Horror yesterday and afterwards I immediately took to the web to find out as much about the DeFeos and Lutzes as I could. This blog came up during my search and I’ve been reading post after post of various murder houses ever since. Thank you so much for the wonderful writing, information, and photos!

    • housecrazy says:

      Thanks for leaving a comment! If you have any other ideas for “crime scene houses” – please let me know and I’d be happy to do a post on them!

    • Someone Who Knows Better says:

      If you’re nearing the age of 30 and equating the Amityville Horror and this very real tragedy, you need to ask yourself if you have a firm grasp on reality. Guess what? There’s a big difference between fantasy and reality and real people and
      make believe. You and the blog author would do well to remember this.

  • Does anyone know how or whom I would contact in doing a tour of the house or to simply take pictures of it? Also, beautiful blog and photos. Really appreciated the positivity with the posts and comments. Too often to do you see very degrading pieces on such topics.

    • jefferama@aol.com says:

      There are no tours of the home….it is a private residence. I know the family and have been to the home but they like their privacy. If you send me your email address to jefferama@aol.com I will send you photos that I took when I was there in April of 2013.

  • I also do not mean any sort of disrespect. Just curious :-) thank you

  • Sandra says:

    We recently visited Holcomb and then Garden City. We respectfully drove by the house, still looks exactly the same, beautiful, but the trees are in bad shape, dead or dying. The drive and surrounding area has such a sadness to this day. We then drove over to the cemetary an visited the graves of Mr and Mrs. Clutter, Nance and Kenyon. This has been something that I have wanted to do for years, and I never imagined how much grief I still felt for them. The sight of their headstones brought me to tears, and I could not leave without cleaning their headstones and praying for them. If anything this trip has made me feel more for the family than I did before, they feel like family, and I grieve for them as well as their remaining children. I had a strong urge to stay with them, not leave the graves, but as I left, I told them I’m sorry and that I hoped that they had not only found peace but each other in their journey… and quietly I said goodbye. Of the many cases I have read and researched, this family haunts my mind the most, a tragic reminder of the brevity of life and the madness of evil.

  • Tony Garcia says:

    So whatever happen to the older Clutter daughters that were already out of the house?

  • Paul Irsik says:

    The house should have been bull;bulldozed most people look at it as a shrine to Truman Capote. The lane looks bad as all the trees are dead The hjouse frame is the same as it was in 1958 but that is all Jeff Balam to read your post is disgusting

    • jefferama@aol.com says:

      Not sure why you think my posts are disgusting…nor do I care….The house is not a shrine to Capote…hardly…it’s a beautiful home and the owners have tended to it beautifully both inside and out since purchasing it….The lane is beautiful in the spring and summer….the trees are not dead….have you ever been there? And if you were was it during the winter? To say that that the lane and the frame of the house is the only things that are the same as they were in 1959 is simply nonsense….you’ve not been inside the house or on the property or you wouldn’t even make that statement. Perhaps you should educate yourself before making such claims….for this is really what is disgusting….

    • Everett Green says:

      Mr. Irsik. I hope you read my comment below, in which I have asked Jeff B. to view this subject from a different perspective. I’m a Garden City native and, though we are not personally acquainted, I believe I understand why this is probably a deeply personal issue for you, compared to most people.

      I don’t know that either of us will be successful in convincing Jeff B. to understand that this subject matter still brings painful memories to many people. But, like you, I felt strongly enough about it to at least try.

      My best to you, sir.

    • jefferama@aol.com says:

      I know exactly who Mr Irsik is….His family worked for the Clutters but were not friends with the family. I also have seen him interviewed several times in print and on tv interviews….(Not sure if he was compensated or not but I wouldn’t doubt it)……I have been embraced by every person I’ve ever met on my trips to Garden City & Holcomb….and everyone is most willing to talk about the Clutters, Capote and everything else pertaining to 56 years ago…..I wonder if you Mr. Green or Ms Patterson have ever been to Valley View Cemetery and left flowers on the Clutter Graves? Mr Irsik called my post disgusting and you want me to apologize? I don’t think so….and I believe you are the one who needs to educate yourself…the link you left must be the only piece you’ve ever read on the subject…..I also wanted to comment that it was just a few short years later after the Clutters were murdered that Garden City & Holcomb officials allowed Columbia Pictures to shoot the film at the Finney County Courthouse as well as The Clutter House….7 of the jurors and many Holcomb townsfolk were used as extras….and you are commenting 56 years later about my insensitivity? Amazing….

      • Joanne Patterson says:

        Jeff, a public website is not the forum to dispute the feelings of others, especially on this subject. No one can understand how someone else feels unless he or she were there when it happened. Whether or not I did or didn’t do something is not relevant here. Let’s respect each other for what we can contribute to this website. I enjoy hearing from people from all over the country about certain subjects and I would like to continue to do so. If you have thoughts that do not involve us as a group, please direct them to that person in a private e-mail. I do not consider myself a morbid person, but if people put me in that category, that is their right. If my comments were in any way responsible for opening old wounds or causing emotional pain, I would be the first to apologize.

  • Everett Green says:

    Jeff, you obviously have great interest and fascination with the subject matter. But your comments touch wounds still deeply felt by people who knew the Clutter family.
    For many people from Holcomb and Garden City who lived through that tragic time, Capote’s book and the subsequent movies, etc.,aren’t viewed as masterpieces or even as entertainment. Worse yet, they all – to at least some degree – portray people and events we knew personally – in some cases – very inaccurately. Furthermore, the house is understandably viewed by many with great interest. But for many people with close, personal connections, that interest seems morbid and disrespectful.
    I was not yet born when the Clutters were murdered, but I grew up with family, friends and coworkers who were connected very closely with the family and also the aftermath of the crimes.
    My impression is that your connection to all of this, while very focused and intense, is much more remote. This prevents you from having sensitivity about it.
    If you were more familiar and more sensitive, you would know better than to tell Mr. Paul Irsik that he needs to educate himself.
    I would suggest you use this link to educate yourself: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/in-cold-blood-deaths-still-haunt-town/

    (Mr. Irsik’s name appears in the bottom part of the article).

    After reading the article, I hope you will agree that Mr. Irsik is due an apology.

    I further hope that, before again claiming to be so knowledgeable, you develop- if not greater knowledge-greater sensitivity.

    Best wishes.

  • Mr. Green, it is indeed refreshing to read your response. I was afraid that this tragic subject was becoming a source of contention between those of us who have read books and seen movies and those who actually knew the family personally and lived through the horror of losing four friends and neighbors. I recognized the name “Irsik” immediately and recall the name “Vic Irsik” from Mr. Capote’s book. I immediately signed onto a Facebook page to confirm that my recollection was accurate. I cannot imagine what it would have been like to actually know the Clutter family and live in Holcomb or Garden City during that time. Many years ago, I bought a CD from the Holcomb newspaper which contained all of the articles about what happened there from the crime to the execution of the criminals. I don’t know if this CD is still available, but it not only gave me a deeper understanding of what went on there, but how the town was changed forever because of the media attention and Mr. Capote’s book. Thank you, Mr. Green, for your sensitive response to Jeffrey. It confirms the forgiving and spiritual nature of the sort of people that we “city folk” do not meet often enough.

  • Paul Irsik says:

    Mr Jeff Balaam you claim to be an expert on the Clutters to set you straight my family and the Clutters were personal friends my dad was foreman for 18 years my 2 older brothers an my self worked for him my dad was Bonnie Clutters pauber at the funeral .The sad part of any time something happens like this there is always some body like you around . To take a picture that was painted by a guy who had killed a family like the Clutters into the house and than have a picture taken with it would have to be as sick as the one who painted it . The worse thing about is there is 2 girls and there kids and there grand kids who will have to put up with people like you And i don’t need to check my information i lived it and i have every paper written about it

  • jefferama@aol.com says:

    What is “Sick” is that it is you Mr Irsik has exploited the Clutter Family by granting interviews and such….it’s clear you resent Mr Capote also because there is so little mention of you in his book or anywhere else for that matter. I imagine you and your family were very unhappy that Susan, Nancy & Mr. Ewalt were the ones front and center in the section pertaining to that Sunday Morning discovery of the bodies. I also know that the surviving Clutter daughters would have not wanted the house demolished either and I know for a fact they have returned within the past two years to see the house. Although something so terrible happened at River Valley Farm in the early morning hours of November 15th 1959, I’m sure there were many good times and love shared in that house in the years before. The new owners have lived there longer than the Clutters did and it is their home now….and a home Herb Clutter would be proud that it has been so wonderfully preserved and has such a loving family living inside it….If the memories are so painful for you, it’s interesting you visit blogs and have every paper about it….your comments here are so angry, negative, judge-mental , insensitive and very unchristian like….the very thing the Clutters were not….and since you say you knew them so well I’m sure at least you’ll agree with me on that…And by all the letters & emails that my articles and lectures generate….it seems most people I’ve met are indeed happy to have somebody like me around…..

  • George P says:

    Taking a possession of a murderer into the scene of the crime is insane and insensitive. Any rational adult would know that.

  • Marshal Allen Bailey says:

    I grew up in Cimarron, perhaps 40 miles East of Holcomb. I was a young man when the killings took place. Although I never knew the Clutters personally, I have grown up with and around several folks that did, including my dad.
    I don’t have anything to add to this thread other than to say that the pain is real and still lingers to this day. I have to throw my hat in the direction of the natives here who wish that Capote had never came to town at all. The folks who were not impressed with Capote’s so called ‘masterpiece’ in light of the horror of the event.
    Mr. Irsik, I have never met you personally, but know some Irsiks around the Ingalls area. Not entirely sure if you are related or not. However, God bless you sir. I am sorry that such an event had to be a part of your family’s life. Honor and respect.

  • Judy Fullmer says:

    I agree George P, can’t imagine anyone doing that. There is curiousity about such events, but never cross the line of respect.

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