The Bruno House in Texas

image from: http://www.robertbruno.com/

image from: http://www.robertbruno.com/

Like a four-legged alien being peering out over the desert, the Bruno House in Ransom Canyon, Texas beckons to travelers and house lovers alike.

Famed architect Robert R. Bruno began his steel and glass home in 1973 and worked on it until he died in 2008.

Robert Bruno in front of his Steel House project in 1977:

image from: http://www.robertbruno.com/

image from: http://www.robertbruno.com/

Bruno originally trained as a sculptor, hence the sculptural qualities of this unique home.

image from: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ransom_Canyon_Steel_House_2009.JPG (by: Leaflet)

image from: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ransom_Canyon_Steel_House_2009.JPG (by: Leaflet)

Remarkably, he built the structure entirely himself spending many years expanding, tweaking and perfecting it. The rusted steel of the exterior gave rise to its nicknames: “The Steel House” and, “The Steel Mansion”.

image from: http://www.robertbruno.com/

image from: http://www.robertbruno.com/

Bruno used welded metal for all of the walls and later added stained glass windows as a nod to the old church heritage of the desert southwest.

image from: http://www.robertbruno.com/

image from: http://www.robertbruno.com/

Bruno never really intended to build a residence – he was more interested in creating a large-scale sculpture – but he did actually move into the house in 2008 just a short while before he passed away from complications from cancer.

image from: http://www.robertbruno.com/

image from: http://www.robertbruno.com/

Robert Bruno taught for many years at Texas Tech’s School of Architecture and enthusiastically shared his work-in-progress with both students, tourists, and lookiloos alike.

image from: http://www.robertbruno.com/

image from: http://www.robertbruno.com/

One thing that endears me to this architect/homeowner is that he was very open and generous in sharing images of his house and allowing it to be freely photographed. This is refreshing because I often run into famous architectural homes that are restricted from public photography (even from the outside) and fiercely guarded and controlled by copyright laws.

image from: http://www.robertbruno.com/

image from: http://www.robertbruno.com/

There’s something really liberating about working on a project for over 30 years and having the whole thing be open to anyone passing by who is interested. In that sense, the Steel House in Texas was less of a home to one individual, and more of a welcoming destination for many.

R.I.P Robert Bruno… you did good.

~~~

Sources:

http://www.robertbruno.com/

http://www.roadsideamerica.com/tip/9240

http://www.eikongraphia.com/?p=2016

http://www.detourart.com/robert-bruno-architect-and-sculptor-of-the-steel-house-1945-2008/

http://www.texasescapes.com/Byron-Browne/Steel-House.htm

 

 

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